Designing homemade Halloween costumes for kids

Halloween is a time of the year that a lot of children look forward to. They are able to dress up in costumes, they are (oftentimes) able to meet up with their trick-or-treating friends in the neighborhood and, of course, it’s the one time of the year when having a big bag full of candy is usually permitted…even by the most health-conscious kind of parents.

Another part of the fun is not just putting on a costume, but coming up with what to wear as well. If you want to create some great memories between you and your child during the Halloween holiday, why not decide to bypass going to a store and instead, design a homemade costume, instead?

Does that sound a bit overwhelming? It doesn’t have to be. Check some of these tips out below:

Make a party out of it. The only thing more fun for your child than designing a Halloween costume is letting them invite some of their friends over so that everyone can do it together. It’s a great Saturday or Sunday afternoon activity. Plus, if the parents are willing to stick around, you can provide each other with tips (and support).

Brainstorm with your child. First, start by discussing with your child what they would like to be. Chances are, they will immediately say something like a favorite cartoon character or action hero, but you can also make some of your own recommendations as well. Look online at different kinds of kid’s costumes that can inspire your children to think outside of the “television box” or movie screen.

Create a pattern. By this, it could be purchasing a traditional pattern to cut the fabric with and sew up, but by this we actually mean create a guideline to follow. There is a wealth of ideas on websites like YouTube and even Parenting.com (put Halloween costumes in the search field) that will provide you with step-by-step ways to match your imagination with reality.

Add some props. What makes a costume just that much more authentic is to add a few details. Whether it’s making a police badge out of some cardboard and tin foil, purchasing some felt angle wings or going to a local thrift store to buy a string of pearls or a broach so that your little girl can look like a queen, make sure to do all that you can to have your child’s costume seem as close to “the real thing” as it possibly can.

Be weather-conscious. Let’s face it. October is a pretty unpredictable time of the year and so while it might be warm enough for your child to wear just their costume, there’s also a chance that it might be a bit too chilly for them to go without a coat, scarf or pair of gloves. There’s really no fun in wearing a costume if no one gets to see it, so when you’re designing the outfit, keep the “outwear” in mind. Maybe purchase a coat from a local thrift store and decorate it or find a creative way for the hat, gloves and scarf match the costume. It’s a minor detail that a lot of parents overlook, but it’s also one that can make all the difference in your little one’s trick-or-treat world.

 

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