Crochet Home Business

Crocheting

Use your talent to start your own crochet business. Here are some tips to get your crochet business started.

Crocheted Heirloom Names For Cash – Crocheting, a method of fabric-making, involves a technique of using a hooked tool and yarn, or thread. An endless chain of looped stitches is created in rounds or rows and is secured only when the end of the strand is pulled through the last loop.

In the early 1800s, crochet was used as a less costly form of lace. For over a century and a half, the most popular form of crochet was done in thread. Patterns of open and closed mesh, called filet crochet, created intriguing forms of art.

Filet crochet is still one of the most popular forms of crochet today. One of the best-selling items is family names made with the filet crochet technique. Because this skill is so simple to learn, this would most likely be a good place for you to begin if you are thinking of earning extra cash from a hobby.

Step One: Is It Worth It?
The first step is determining how much money you wish to earn from your craft. If your goal is to earn a minimum of $200 per week, divided by five days (for a work week), then you need to earn at least $40 each day. How many pieces will you need to create to earn $40? Can you realistically create this many in a 6-8 hour work day?

Let’s talk about the cost of supplies. A large ball of crochet thread (about 1,000 yards) costs around $3.50. At an average of eight letters per name, you can make approximately two heirloom name pieces out of one ball of thread. Thus, your expenditures are very low, giving you a greater profit in the end.

As a former crochet artisan, one of my hottest selling items was crocheted family names in thread. Customers loved these heirloom pieces because when finished and framed, they were beautiful, elegant gifts. I charged $3 per letter on these items. For an average name (8 letters), I earned $24. Since I crochet at lightening speed, I could complete an entire name in about an hour. If I filled two orders, at an average of 8 letters per name, I met and exceeded my daily goal by 20%, with only about a couple of hours’ worth of work!

Step Two: Define & Target Your Market
Who will benefit from your product? What needs do your product meet? What age range will most likely be interested in buying your wares? Are your skills marketable in your hometown, or will you need to advertise elsewhere (surrounding cities, internet, etc.)?

Research is key. Use your telephone book, local chamber of commerce, and the internet to explore your possibilities. Find out if there are similar businesses that offer the type of crafts you create; if so, can you offer comparable prices and/or services against the competitor?

While I did maintain customers within my own community, most of my crocheting skills were marketed through the internet. At one point, I even teamed up with an artisan in another state and as a result, stayed busy for many months.

There are many venues in which to sell heirloom names. Keep an eye open for local events in which you might purchase booth space. Quilt shows, bake sales, and even yard sales will give you exposure. Picture frame shops are another great place to showcase and advertise your crocheted heirloom names. Offering a certain percentage of the profits from orders placed is a great incentive for shop owners to help sell your product.

Flea markets also give you great exposure. Do some digging and find out what the most common last names are then make up several of each. Customers are more likely to buy products on the spot at flea markets, rather than place an order for something they can’t walk away with, holding in their hand.

Another great idea is to crochet several popular baby names in pastel colors, frame them, then take them to a local baby boutique. Smaller boutiques are always looking for a unique item to sell because it sets them apart from their competition.

Step Three: Price the Product
Once you have determined your target market, it is time to set your prices. Do not underestimate your skills and abilities. You can always lower your prices, but you can very rarely raise them and experience positive results.

Set your prices reasonably, according to what you think your crafts are truly worth. How much would you pay for a handmade item similar to yours? Chances are, if you aren’t willing to pay the price you’ve set on your product, neither will your potential customers.

Putting a price tag on your creations can be a challenging part of this process. Maintaining a record of time spent working as well as keeping all receipts will help you in this step.

Step Four: Follow Through
Now that you’ve decided to utilize your crafting skills to earn an income, identified your market, and have a detailed product list with prices, you are ready to craft for cash. Always look for more opportunities. Customers are everywhere.

Obtaining new customers is important, but remember to keep your current customers happy. Stay in contact with them, always asking what you can do to accommodate their needs. When you follow through with consistency, your customers will become comfortable with you and your services and rely on you for their future purchases.

About the author:
The WAHM Ghostwriter creates unique articles for online business owners. Hire the WAHM Ghostwriter and instantly free up more of your time today.

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About Crafty Mom

Tricia WAHM (and loving it) of 3 great kids.Married to Mr. Right. Family means everything to her. The Lord is the man that Tricia walks with..
Tricia Has always had a passion for crafting and hobbies and wants to share that passion with other moms.

Comments

  1. Nadja says:

    Thank you for giving people like me the information and ideas that I need to posibly start a crochet business. It is winter, and this is a great oportunity to start. Thanks again for your words of advice.

  2. Pamela says:

    Thank you , for sharing your information on how to start selling and what will be a good seller, i’m in the process of building my crochet work. and i wasnt quite sure how to go about getting them out to the public.

    but reading your tips, really helped me and inspired me to keep at it and go for it. :)

  3. Marjorie says:

    During this recession, it is so nice to have someone lend a helping hand. Thank you for your advice.

  4. This is some great advice. It will really help people who want to learn to start their own small business from a hobby. If people are like you and can crochet at speed then they can even do this as a second job or at the weekend for a little extra income.

  5. insiya says:

    I am in crochet buisness,as per order.Ihave done the same as you have mentioned

  6. CHERYL WARNER says:

    HI EVERYONE, THANKS FOR INSPIRATION, I STARTED CROCHET AT 9 YEARS OLD, MOM OF 4 KIDS OVER 30 YEARS EXP CROCHETING, I THINKTIME TO START A LITTTLE BUSSINESS, KEEP UP THE GREAT IDEAS, CHERYL

  7. Christine Ostrowski says:

    Thank you for the business tips. Where do I get a prcatical and inexpensive website? Does anyone live in Missouri who would like to be my business partner? God Bless You, Christine

    • Hi Christine
      If you want to get a website, it is easy to set one up yourself. You can buy a domain and install a blogging software on it. If you need further help me, you can contact me and I can see how I can do for you.

      Cheers!
      Wendy